Holiday Foreplay with Dani Harper

Posted December 23, 2011 by Carmel in / 41 Comments

Holiday Foreplay @ Rabid Reads

Today on the blog I have author Dani Harper. *waves* Werewolf books! Yay! You’re a girl after my own heart. Dani’s latest book, Changeling Dawn, is coming out in 3 days. A little late for the holidays but who needs an excuse to buy books? I mean really! I know that I sure don’t.

Dani Harper Author Bio

Dani Harper is a newspaper editor turned paranormal author. There isn’t anything she likes better than exploring the supernatural — unless it’s writing romantic suspense. Of course, all of her stories have at least one foot in the netherworld…

A Canadian who spent many years in northern Alberta, Dani now lives on an island in Alaska! She and her husband operate a commercial fishing boat and her stories are written on land or at sea, with the help of her executive secretary, Fiona the Pug.

Dani currently has a hot new shapeshifter series from Kensington Brava. CHANGELING MOON and CHANGELING DREAM are available now in trade paperback and ebook. Her latest novel, CHANGELING DAWN, is being released on December 27th.

Website / Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Christmas & The Werewolf Connection
by Dani Harper

In my new shapeshifter series, the Macleod family are able to become wolves at will. They call themselves Changelings rather than werewolves, because their human side is always in control. Well, almost always… If you meet a wolf in the forest, cross your fingers that it’s a Changeling because of their most sacred law: Never harm a human. In my research on wolves and werewolves, I’ve collected a lot of fascinating stories. Most people don’t think of wolves in association with Christmas, but they’ve been there all along in myth and legend! Here’s a sampling of seasonal folklore:

Christmas Eve in some countries was thought to be a mystical and supernatural time. In Scandinavia it was uncommon for anyone to deliberately leave the house, especially between cockcrow and daybreak, because of the likelihood of meeting uncanny beings such as trolls riding upon wolves!

The time favored for werewolves to transform and roam in the Germanic, Baltic and Slavic countries was the 12 nights between Christmas and the Epiphany. People believed the souls of the dead were also roaming at that time. A Norse superstition gave it a slightly different twist – on the festival of Christmas the spirits of the dead were suddenly and strangely metamorphosed into wolves, and at an appointed place they assembled together during the night and raged fiercely against mankind and all other creatures.

In 14th century Normandy, the varouage was an excommunicated person who became a werewolf on the nights between Christmas and Candlemas or during Advent. During this time, he was either redeemed – or doomed to belong to the devil and run as a werewolf forever.

Holly, mistletoe and evergreen were often brought into homes in Britain during the Christmas season, but not just for decoration. The greenery was to keep away evil beings including ghosts, demons and werewolves! Even the barns were decorated with boughs above the doors and windows to protect the livestock.

In many European countries, it was believed that children born on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day would develop a taste for human flesh and grow up to be werewolves! This was said to be a divine punishment for being born on the same day as the Christ child. In Romania, if a child was conceived on Christmas Eve, they were said to be cursed to become a werewolf because couples were supposed to refrain from sexual activities on that day.

Certain holy days like Christmas were said to counteract werewolf transformations due to the increased strength of the forces of good. So werewolves, who were usually helpless to prevent their change at the full moon, enjoyed a respite during these holiday times.

However, it was also supposed that in revenge for the restraint put upon them on Christmas, the powers of darkness became all the more rampant afterwards. In Sweden it was said that after Christmas there was a rash of men turning into wolves. These werewolves were more ferocious than natural wolves. They were said to attack horses, enter homes and destroy storehouses. Only special prayers could keep them away. According to the legend, anyone who came upon the spot where these wolfmen were transformed would die within a year!

Giveaway

Leave Dani a comment, telling her which of these lupine legends is your favorite (or share a new one!), and you’ll be entered to win a signed copy of her upcoming release, Changeling Dawn, and a Dani Harper tote bag! Giveaway is available to US and Canadian mailing addresses only. Please read my Giveaway Policy before entering. Good luck!

CLOSED: Winners

Changeling Dawn cover

Buy From: Amazon.comTBDB&N Icon

RUN

Shadow and moonlight merge beneath her bare feet, the forest floor blurring as she flees the dogs and torches. Werewolf, monster — those are the names given her kind by the humans who hate them.

HUNT

Kenzie Macleod has spent her whole life hiding what she is, and she’s not about to open up to any man, even one as powerfully attractive as wildlife expert Josh Talarkoteen. But legend says that a Changeling cannot escape the call of her true mate, even in the wilderness of backcountry Alaska.

MATE

An isolated archeological site, a terrified Changeling cub, a secretive research center — as Kenzie and Josh face the ultimate betrayal, his obsidian eyes promise untold pleasure and hint at dark secrets of his own…

Carmel Signature

About the Blogger
I review Urban Fantasy and Paranormal Romance books with a focus all things werewolf. Based out of Ottawa, Canada

Google+ / Twitter / FB

Owner, designer and main blogger behind Rabid Reads. Avid book reader, snowboard bunny, video gamer and Supernatural fan. I love all things paranormal, werewolves especially. Oh, and I’m Canadian, eh!

Facebook Twitter Google+    

Tags: , , ,


Get your daily dose of Rabid Reads in your inbox! Subscribe via e-mail:
Rakuten Kobo U.S


41 responses to “Holiday Foreplay with Dani Harper

  1. Dani, how I have been wanting to grab your series of books since I first heard about them a couple of weeks ago! I’ve been chasing you all over, from blog to blog trying to win your beautiful tote and book ever since, haha!
    My favorite lupine legend is the British one, where they used Holly , Mistletoe and Evergreen to keep away evil beings. Fat chance – but nice try, LOL! Like wolves aren’t used to nature?! Hmmm…
    Thank you so much for the giveaway opportunity!
    Happy Holidays to you and to you, Carmel!
    Gena Robertson
    robertsongena@hotmail.com

  2. “Holly, mistletoe and evergreen were often brought into homes in Britain during the Christmas season, but not just for decoration. The greenery was to keep away evil beings including ghosts, demons and werewolves! Even the barns were decorated with boughs above the doors and windows to protect the livestock.”

    I’m not sure how effective it would have been for keeping away evil but they did try. 😛

    thanks for the awesome giveaway and Happy Holidays ladies! 🙂

    Terri M
    oklahomamommy0306@gmail.com

  3. My favorite legend is only shifting on a full moon, and the arguments against it stating that they can shift whenever. It’s interesting to see each authors take on it 🙂

    Jess @ Taking It One Book

    takingitonebookatatime(at)yahoo(dot)com

  4. This is my favorite:

    Holly, mistletoe and evergreen were often brought into homes in Britain during the Christmas season, but not just for decoration. The greenery was to keep away evil beings including ghosts, demons and werewolves! Even the barns were decorated with boughs above the doors and windows to protect the livestock.

    If it didn’t work it was still pretty ;).
    Thank you.
    MERRY CHRISTMAS!

    vsloboda(at)gmail(dot)com

  5. I like this one

    Holly, mistletoe and evergreen were often brought into homes in Britain during the Christmas season, but not just for decoration. The greenery was to keep away evil beings including ghosts, demons and werewolves! Even the barns were decorated with boughs above the doors and windows to protect the livestock.

    So this is where Wreaths came from 🙂

    Vivien
    deadtossedwaves at gmail dot com

  6. these are some awesome ones!! i think its interesting the bringing in of mistletoe.. when i was in europe i found out its considered a menace because it kills trees.. we never really think of it like that here

    please enter me to win!

    alainala AT hotmail DOT ca

  7. Dani you always have the most interesting tidbits. I live in town now, but used to live up in the woods and mistletoe was often seen in the trees and we were told it was a fungi that would kill the trees. However, it was always a great source for making holiday money. You go out and shoot down the high mistletoe in the very tall trees and bundle it up in small packages with ribbon. Now I understand that keeping it around could have stemmed from this tradition of protection. Thank you for sharing this fascinating research with us today. So what happens if you kiss a werewolf under the mistletoe hmmm there could be a story there 🙂 What is the effect of mistletoe on Changelings? Happy holidays Carmel and thank you once again for bringing a wonderful author to share with us.
    dz59001[at]gmail[dot]com

  8. Na

    Wow, many of these legends are new to me. I like the European one where children born on Christmas Eve/Day would grow up to be werewolves. Nowawadays to be born on such a day is celebrated rather than seen as a curse. Thank you for such an interesting post, Dani.

    Cambonified[at]yahoo[dot]com

  9. Sounds like a awesome book, right up my alley in books I love to read 🙂

    My favorite is this:
    n many European countries, it was believed that children born on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day would develop a taste for human flesh and grow up to be werewolves! This was said to be a divine punishment for being born on the same day as the Christ child. In Romania, if a child was conceived on Christmas Eve, they were said to be cursed to become a werewolf because couples were supposed to refrain from sexual activities on that day.

    Kinda funny given that Christmas is in 2 days from now, gotta love timing 😉 Its such a different thing than what we normally believe, I grew up thinking that if you were boring on Christmas, then that brought you good luck. Really makes you think.

  10. I love Normandy legend– with a twist or two that would be a very cool paranormal Christmas romance!

    Merry Christmas!
    wayfaringwriter at gmail dot com

  11. In many European countries, it was believed that children born on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day would develop a taste for human flesh and grow up to be werewolves! This was said to be a divine punishment for being born on the same day as the Christ child. In Romania, if a child was conceived on Christmas Eve, they were said to be cursed to become a werewolf because couples were supposed to refrain from sexual activities on that day.

    I have to say that is my favorite though I liked them all and honestly is the first time I heard any of them. Thank you for sharing.

    vampiremistress2010(at)gmail(dot)com

  12. Such great old legends. My fave is:
    In many European countries, it was believed that children born on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day would develop a taste for human flesh and grow up to be werewolves! This was said to be a divine punishment for being born on the same day as the Christ child. In Romania, if a child was conceived on Christmas Eve, they were said to be cursed to become a werewolf because couples were supposed to refrain from sexual activities on that day.

    It makes me wonder what they did with children who were born or conceived on those days. Probably not something I would really want an answer to.
    Have a wonderful holiday season.
    manning_j2004 at yahoo dot com

  13. My favorite legend from this is where in Romania they refrain from sexual intercourse on Christmas Eve because their conceived offspring would be a werewolf. I have a friend that is Romanian so I will ask her next time that I see her about that one. I have been wanting to read this book for a while because I love the cover and I enjoy reading about werewolves. Thanks for the giveaway.

    jcalvert719(at)yahoo(dot)com

  14. My favorite–
    In many European countries, it was believed that children born on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day would develop a taste for human flesh and grow up to be werewolves! This was said to be a divine punishment for being born on the same day as the Christ child. In Romania, if a child was conceived on Christmas Eve, they were said to be cursed to become a werewolf because “couples were supposed to refrain from sexual activities on that day.” Seriously?

    I love shifters and your changeling world was been a joy to visit.

    alterlisa AT yahoo DOT com
    http://lisaslovesbooksofcourse.blogspot.com/

  15. Loved the post! Very interesting… I had no idea there were connections between werewolves and Christmas. I liked reading about the Norse superstition. That’s intense and scary! Thanks for the giveaway & Happy Holidays!!!

    yadkny@hotmail.com

  16. The holly, mistletoe and evergreen isnt one I have heard before but it does seem almost reasonable for the times.

    bacchus76 at myself dot com

  17. I had no idea that werewolves were so active at Christmastime! At least those souls could be redeemed during that time if they were lucky. It is no wonder they called those “Dark Times.” Goodness!
    I like the Changeling way of living. It seems they have the best of both worlds.
    Merry Christmas!
    Phoenix

  18. I wasn’t aware of the werewolve and Christmas connection. I do love reading different authors’ takes on werwolves though and have been wanting to check out your series. Thanks for the giveaway.

    sab5723 at hotmail dot com

  19. Love the post and really enjoyed the Changeling series to date!

    I’ve heard the holly, mistletoe and evergreen myth before. My grandmother told me this tale when we were decorating when I was about 13.

    Kate
    mleger0546 AT rogers DOT com

  20. I LOVE the werewolf traditions!
    My favorite has to be Holly, mistletoe and evergreen were often brought into homes in Britain during the Christmas season, but not just for decoration. The greenery was to keep away evil beings including ghosts, demons and werewolves! Even the barns were decorated with boughs above the doors and windows to protect the livestock.

    Mindy 🙂
    Birdsooong@aol.com

  21. Like Gena, I too, have been following you from blog to blog in hopes of winning…lol

    My favorite legend is the only being able to shift on the full moon. I love the different takes on this.

    I hope everyone had a Wonderful Holiday!

    Deb
    mammy3114@ yahoo.com

  22. I love the legends and am familiar with all of these…and I love reading them.
    As I live int he interior of Alaska there are so few evergreen or any pine trees as the sold season is is too long and at sub zero temps so they just don’t survive. My heart is has been calling back back to the Pacific Northwest, and back to my beloved mountains and pine trees. I miss everything about hem and especially the mistletoe plants as well that do not survive here either….*S*
    Thank you for the invitation and wishing you even more success….*S*

    Darcy
    pommawolf @hotmail.com

  23. It’s a good thing that my family doesn’t live in a European country. My brother was born on Christmas Eve and my neice was born on Christmas. I can’t wait to read Changeling Dawn!

  24. Hi! When I was young my father use to tell me the Red Ridding Hood story before I go to sleep. And I never image the wolf as a beast but something that should shift to be able to trick the little Red… And even in the book the wolf always wore clothes, so he was kind of a shifter to me and I think it was the very first and probably one of my best werewolf tale when I was young! In 2011, the movie The Red Ridding Hood was made and the wolf was a shifter! YAY! LOL Thanks for this chance! Proserpine

    proserpinecravedfor(at)hotmail(dot)com

  25. I love this one 🙂

    Holly, mistletoe and evergreen were often brought into homes in Britain during the Christmas season, but not just for decoration. The greenery was to keep away evil beings including ghosts, demons and werewolves! Even the barns were decorated with boughs above the doors and windows to protect the livestock.

    I’ve learned something new today 🙂

    june111(at)att(dot)net

  26. Happy New Year Carmel and Dani.
    I too have followed you on your blog tour and have since learned so many interesting things based on your research. Thank you so much. I enjoyed reading “Certain holy days like Christmas were said to counteract werewolf transformations due to the increased strength of the forces of good. So werewolves, who were usually helpless to prevent their change at the full moon, enjoyed a respite during these holiday times. ”
    Carol L
    Lucky4750 (at) aol (dot) com

  27. I wasn’t aware of the British legend regarding holly, mistletoe and evergreen. That’s very interesting!

    Thanks for the giveaway!

    GFC Darlene
    darlenesbooknook at gmail dot com

  28. Very interesting! I found them all very interesting and I must admit, I have never heard of any of them. I find the one about children born on Christmas. All are certainly interesting! I look forward to reading all your work!

  29. My favorite legend is only being able to shift on the full moon. I love reading about werewolves and all the different takes about them when reading books! Thank you for the great giveaway!
    tishajean@ charter.net